British Values

The government set out their definition of British values in the 2011 Prevent Strategy. These were reinforced in September 2014 due to recent events. These new regulations will sit alongside the requirements of the Equalities Act, which also applies to all types of schools.

Schools will be expected to focus on, and be able to show, how our work with pupils is effective in embedding fundamental British values.

At Brough Primary School we promote the core British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance towards those of other faiths.

These values are central to the school’s ethos and can be seen throughout the school’s life. Some examples of core British values at our school are outlined below.

Pupil Voice is an integrated aspect of school life and the children of Brough Primary school understand that the democratic process is an effective way to do this. All children are encouraged to debate topics of interest, express their views and make a contribution to matters that directly involve pupils. Children also have the opportunity to have their voices heard through the school council and surveys.

  • Members of the school council are elected by their own class using a democratic voting system
  • School council representatives
  • Children discuss and agree their class rules
  • Children have an active involvement in the selection process of new staff
  • There are open auditions or trials for performances and competitions
  • Pupil surveys e.g. ideas for purchasing playground equipment

Pupils will encounter rules and laws throughout their lives. We want our pupils to understand that whether these rules govern the class, the school, the community or the country, they are set for good reasons and should be adhered to.

  • Behaviour policy – consistent whole school approach to behaviour with agreed sanctions
  • Following class rules
  • Following rules during sporting events, competitions and during team games
  • Children are helped to distinguish the difference between right and wrong – in the classroom, during assemblies and on the playground
  • Pedestrian, cycle and scooter training
  • E-safety and fire initiatives
  • Class discussions and debates relating to topics and current news

 

Everyone in the school works together to create a positive culture at Brough Primary School, so that the children are in a safe environment where choices and freedoms are encouraged.

  • Clubs and activities are open to all children
  • Following class rules
  • Providing opportunities for children to develop their self-esteem through sharing achievements and successes
  • Looking after personal and school equipment in the classroom and around the school
  • Carrying out jobs in class and around the school e.g. book monitors, door monitors, lunchtime helpers
  • Freedom to makes choices by joining extra-curricular activities.

 

 

Our pupils learn together with respect for each other. We value and celebrate our peers. Pupils know that we respect and appreciate each other no matter what differences may exist.

  • The pupils know and understand that it is expected that respect is shown to everyone.
  • R.E. curriculum – knowledge, discussion of other faiths (beliefs and celebrations)
  • Performances to the whole school: Nativity plays, Diwali and Christingle Service
  • Charity work – shoe boxes, Hull and East Riding Food Bank, Children in Need, Children’s society.
  • Multicultural assemblies, stories and music
  • Topic work studying various countries, people and cultures
  • Celebrate national events
  • Links and visits are promoted with local faith communities and places of worship. For example, members of different faiths or religions are invited to school and we attend events where people of other faiths discuss their religion and share their knowledge.

Tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs is the idea that we understand that people in our community may believe different things to us, but we accept their right to believe in what they want to believe in and we do not impose our own beliefs on them.

By cultivating an open mind, learning about other cultures and people, and broadening our horizons, we increase our ability to understand and accept others.

  • Accepting people’s traditions and religions
  • Accepting LGBTI+ and non-binary definitions
  • Accepting people’s political stances
  • Tolerating dress codes
  • Accepting people you don’t get along with in 
  • A cultural and diverse curriculum in which other religions and worldviews are studied.

‘Teachers assess pupils’ work accurately and use their good subject knowledge to plan
interesting tasks that engage pupils well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents value the school’s work highly. They believe the school is well led and indicate that the new headteacher has improved the school and that staff are supporting their children well.’

OFSTED comments

‘The enhanced provision, The Bridge, is making a significantly positive contribution to pupils’ ability to self-manage their needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers ask supplementary questions to make sure that pupils have a full understanding of the work they are doing and are making good progress. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘School leaders
and governors are passionate about pupils’ achievement and personal development. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘The special educational needs coordinator identifies the needs of pupils very accurately and makes sure strong provision is in place to meet pupils’ needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils participate in competitive sports, such as cross-country, squash and football, as well as winning local dance competitions.’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher has made sure that senior leaders, and middle leaders, have had very
effective training’

OFSTED comments

‘There is full engagement by the school in a local sports partnership. Pupils say that they
enjoy sport.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils study a wide range of subjects and have a good range of additional activities to
broaden their experiences.’

OFSTED comments

‘Astute use of professional development and support for staff has resulted in good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils engage effectively in learning and enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils are pleasant,
polite and respectful. Attendance is above
average.’

OFSTED comments

‘The extra funding for those pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is used highly
effectively.’

OFSTED comments

‘Children settle quickly into Reception and make good progress because of good leadership and
good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘The local authority has a clear picture of the development of the school and has supported this school securely on its journey of improvement.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils make a good contribution to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school promotes spiritual, moral, social and cultural education very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils take part in
visits to places of interest that then contribute
very well to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Currently, pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, develop good skills and knowledge in reading,
mathematics and a wide range of subjects. ’

OFSTED comments

‘All pupils spoken to say they are safe in school and they enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers’ skilful questioning is used well, especially in guided reading and in mathematics to deepen pupils’ learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The curriculum offers many exciting opportunities for learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents and carers have a very high level of confidence in the work of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘An analysis of pupils’ work by inspectors showed good gains in knowledge, skills and
understanding in reading, mathematics and a wide range of subjects.’

OFSTED comments

‘Governors make a strong contribution to the development of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘The primary school physical education and sports funding is used very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Staff morale is high and there is a shared sense of purpose and a desire for all pupils to
achieve their full potential.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school’s enhanced provision for those pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities is a strength of the school,’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher and governors have high expectations of staff and pupils.’

OFSTED comments