Music – subject information

Intent

Our musical curriculum at Brough Primary School develops learning by giving children the ability to gain knowledge and improve their own wellbeing. We promote a love of music and singing across a broadened curriculum. We use the music scheme ‘Charanga’, which incorporates the National Curriculum requirements, but gives an integrated, practical, exploratory and child-led approach to musical learning.

These are: 1. Listening and Appraising 2. Musical Activities (Warm-up Games; Optional Flexible Games; Singing; Playing instruments; Improvisation; Composition) 3. Performing.

At Brough Primary School, children gain a good understanding of what music is through listening, singing, playing, evaluating, composing and performing, across a range of historical periods, styles, traditions, and musical genres. Performing arts are given real purpose with year-group performances, dance clubs, participation in regional and national competitions and concerts.

We are committed to ensuring children understand the value and importance of music to their own and others’ lives through performance, as well as how music can improve wellbeing. All children have access to music regardless of their ability, race, ethnicity, background or language. SEND pupils are actively encouraged to participate fully as music is often an area of the curriculum which allows them to excel.

 

Aims

The national curriculum for music and performing arts aims to ensure that all pupils:

  1. perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  2. learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  3. understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notation
  4. all pupils should be enabled to participate in and gain knowledge, skills and understanding associated with the artistic practice of drama
  5. pupils should be able to adopt, create and sustain a range of roles, responding appropriately to others in role
  6. they should have opportunities to improvise, devise and script drama for one another and a range of audiences, as well as to rehearse, refine, share and respond thoughtfully to drama and theatre performances
  7. role=play and other drama techniques can help pupils to identify with and explore characters. In these ways, they extend their understanding of what they read and have opportunities to try out the language they have listened to
  8. drama and role-play can contribute to the quality of pupils’ writing by providing opportunities for pupils to develop and order their ideas through playing roles and improvising scenes in various settings
  9. reading, re-reading, and rehearsing poems and plays for presentation and performance give pupils opportunities to discuss language, including vocabulary, extending their interest in the meaning and origin of words.

 

Implementation

The music curriculum at Brough Primary School ensures children sing, listen, play, perform and evaluate. Through Charanga, teachers are able to deliver inclusive lessons for all children to access the musical curriculum in a fun and engaging way, further promoting a love of learning.

The elements of music are taught in classroom lessons so that children are able to use some of the language of music to dissect it, and understand how it is made, played, appreciated and analysed. They also learn how to compose, focusing on different dimensions of music, which in turn feeds their understanding when listening, playing, or analysing music.

Children have the opportunity to not only learn music in the classroom, but also perform, from participating in year-group plays and musical performances to singing in the choir. This can be as part of arena concerts with Young Voices or singing in the community. At Brough Primary School, we pride ourselves on giving the children opportunities to learn to love and appreciate all genres of music, to use their physicality to perform and grow in self-belief, learning life lessons in being team players, sharing and having compassion and understanding for others.

Each year during our Summer Soiree, children have the opportunity to experience performing to a wider audience. This showcases the amazing talent that many of our children have in Brough Primary School with dances ranging from contemporary performances to street dance, and from Maypole dancing to ballroom dancing. The school also gives pupils the opportunity to participate in performing arts outside the school through dance and drama, competing successfully in regional and national competitions. For those children who elect to take part, the East Riding Peripatetic Music Scheme provides individual instrument lessons taught by specialist teachers, which gives the children the opportunity to learn to play a wider range of instruments.

Impact

Music and the performing arts are creative areas that allow children to develop their confidence and their ability to make relationships with their peers. Through music and the performing arts, children learn resilience, determination and experience personal growth so that when they leave us at the end of Year 6 they are able to appreciate and talk about a wide range of musical genres.

To this end, as a school we are confident in the knowledge that we give children not only musical theoretical knowledge, but also a widening of their understanding of music and performing, having given them opportunities to showcase their learning beyond the National Curriculum during performances in and out of school. Children are then well-equipped to further develop their creative abilities and self-expression in secondary school and later life.

Music will also develop an understanding of culture and history, both in relation to students individually, but also in terms of ethnicity across the world.

We measure the impact of our curriculum with the use of a Musical Passport which the children are given at the start of each year. They keep a record of their own assessment in learning, which is regularly updated. This gives the children opportunities to forge their own musical journey, which in turn allows them to discover areas of strength, as well as areas they might like to improve upon.

  • Children will learn and use the key vocabulary that a musician would use.
  • Children will achieve age related expectations in music at the end of their cohort year.
  • Children will retain knowledge that is pertinent to music.
  • Children will participate in wider musical activities.
  • Children will have heightened awareness of musical opportunities available in and outside of school.

Children benefit from an enormously rich palette of musical genres here at Brough Primary School, which allows them to develop their own tastes and preferences as listener, composer or performer. Music gives our children a sense of achievement, self-confidence, interaction with, and awareness of others, and self-reflection.

Further information:

‘The special educational needs coordinator identifies the needs of pupils very accurately and makes sure strong provision is in place to meet pupils’ needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Staff morale is high and there is a shared sense of purpose and a desire for all pupils to
achieve their full potential.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers assess pupils’ work accurately and use their good subject knowledge to plan
interesting tasks that engage pupils well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils participate in competitive sports, such as cross-country, squash and football, as well as winning local dance competitions.’

OFSTED comments

‘Currently, pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, develop good skills and knowledge in reading,
mathematics and a wide range of subjects. ’

OFSTED comments

‘The primary school physical education and sports funding is used very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents and carers have a very high level of confidence in the work of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘There is full engagement by the school in a local sports partnership. Pupils say that they
enjoy sport.’

OFSTED comments

‘An analysis of pupils’ work by inspectors showed good gains in knowledge, skills and
understanding in reading, mathematics and a wide range of subjects.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils are pleasant,
polite and respectful. Attendance is above
average.’

OFSTED comments

‘Governors make a strong contribution to the development of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘School leaders
and governors are passionate about pupils’ achievement and personal development. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils study a wide range of subjects and have a good range of additional activities to
broaden their experiences.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils take part in
visits to places of interest that then contribute
very well to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The curriculum offers many exciting opportunities for learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils make a good contribution to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The enhanced provision, The Bridge, is making a significantly positive contribution to pupils’ ability to self-manage their needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers’ skilful questioning is used well, especially in guided reading and in mathematics to deepen pupils’ learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers ask supplementary questions to make sure that pupils have a full understanding of the work they are doing and are making good progress. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher has made sure that senior leaders, and middle leaders, have had very
effective training’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher and governors have high expectations of staff and pupils.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents value the school’s work highly. They believe the school is well led and indicate that the new headteacher has improved the school and that staff are supporting their children well.’

OFSTED comments

‘The extra funding for those pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is used highly
effectively.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school promotes spiritual, moral, social and cultural education very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Astute use of professional development and support for staff has resulted in good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘The local authority has a clear picture of the development of the school and has supported this school securely on its journey of improvement.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school’s enhanced provision for those pupils who have special educational needs
(SEN) and/or disabilities is a strength of the
school,’

OFSTED comments

‘All pupils spoken to say they are safe in school and they enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Children settle quickly into Reception and make good progress because of good leadership and
good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils engage effectively in learning and enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments