PSHE – subject information

Intent

At Brough Primary school our Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) curriculum gives children the opportunity to be ‘lifelong learners’ with the confidence and ability to develop their skills and understanding when having new experiences, meeting new challenges and finding themselves in unfamiliar situations.

Our PSHE curriculum aims to help children to understand and value how they and others fit into and contribute to the world. We place a strong emphasis on emotional literacy, building resilience and nurturing mental and physical health through the delivery of a programme of engaging and relevant PSHE within a whole school approach, which will impact on their whole education.

At Brough Primary School, good relationships are fundamental to our ethos and our success in being a happy, caring and safe school. Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) is lifelong learning about relationships, emotions, looking after ourselves and different families.

We believe that it is essential to teach PSHE to provide the link between pupils’ health and wellbeing and their academic progress.

 

Aims

The aims of the PSHE curriculum in Brough Primary School are:

  1. To provide children with accurate and relevant knowledge.
  2. To present opportunities to create personal understanding.
  3. To offer a chance to explore a range of values, attitudes, beliefs and rights.

Implementation

At Brough Primary School PSHE/RSE is implemented using the SCARF (Safety, Caring, Achievement, Resilience, Friendship) programme which is a whole school approach. The curriculum for PSHE is delivered throughout the whole school, not just within the classroom. Many objectives are also covered as an important part of school assemblies, where children’s spiritual, moral, social and cultural curiosity is stimulated, challenged and nurtured.

The six topics covered are:

  • Me and My Relationships
  • Valuing Difference
  • Keeping Myself Safe
  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Being my Best
  • Growing and Changing

RSE is taught as explicit lessons through the PSHE and science curriculums but is also embedded in other areas of the curriculum and day-to-day life of the school. In PSHE, RSE is specifically covered in the units ‘Me and My Relationships’ and ‘Growing and Changing’ and in science ‘Animals Including Humans’ and ‘Living Things and Their Habitats’. Some elements of PHSE are covered in the Religious Education curriculum. Children are taught by familiar adults who they have a good rapport with, in order to facilitate constructive and supportive discussions around sensitive topics in a safe and secure environment.

The RSE curriculum has been mapped out in the progression grids which ensure coverage of all of the statutory elements by the end of Year 6; these are delivered at the appropriate age and stage for our children.

Through our progressive curriculum, children develop key skills and are extremely well prepared for the wider world beyond primary school; a world in which they can keep themselves safe and healthy and thrive with the support of the positive relationships they forge with those around them.

Impact

At Brough Primary School we want to ensure that the PSHE that we teach improves the physical and social well-being of pupils. We want pupils to know and understand who they are and how they fit in to and relate to the world around them. Through our PSHE curriculum, we believe that we can enhance children’s education and help them to become caring, respectful and confident individuals. They will be equipped with the knowledge they need to maintain a healthy and positive lifestyle with regard to relationships, their diet and their own personal identity.

When children leave us in Year 6 they will have an in-depth knowledge of how to keep themselves safe and healthy and they will, through respect, tolerance and understanding, forge and maintain positive relationships with a diverse range of family and friendship groups.

Children will meet or exceed the progression of skills requirements in the six topics covered annually.

We measure the impact of our curriculum by: –

  • Monitoring how children demonstrate a healthy outlook towards school – attendance will be in-line with national and behaviour will be good.
  • Discussions will be used to assess knowledge and inform future planning.
  • Children will demonstrate effective interpersonal relationships and a respectful, caring attitude towards others.
  • Children will demonstrate a caring attitude towards and responsibility for the environment, both locally in terms of the school and its surroundings but also the wider world.
  • Monitoring of taught skills across the school to evidence progress.

Further information:

‘The primary school physical education and sports funding is used very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Astute use of professional development and support for staff has resulted in good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school promotes spiritual, moral, social and cultural education very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school’s enhanced provision for those pupils who have special educational needs
(SEN) and/or disabilities is a strength of the
school,’

OFSTED comments

‘Staff morale is high and there is a shared sense of purpose and a desire for all pupils to
achieve their full potential.’

OFSTED comments

‘School leaders
and governors are passionate about pupils’ achievement and personal development. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘The enhanced provision, The Bridge, is making a significantly positive contribution to pupils’ ability to self-manage their needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils participate in competitive sports, such as cross-country, squash and football, as well as winning local dance competitions.’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher has made sure that senior leaders, and middle leaders, have had very
effective training’

OFSTED comments

‘Children settle quickly into Reception and make good progress because of good leadership and
good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher and governors have high expectations of staff and pupils.’

OFSTED comments

‘All pupils spoken to say they are safe in school and they enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils make a good contribution to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers assess pupils’ work accurately and use their good subject knowledge to plan
interesting tasks that engage pupils well.’

OFSTED comments

‘There is full engagement by the school in a local sports partnership. Pupils say that they
enjoy sport.’

OFSTED comments

‘The local authority has a clear picture of the development of the school and has supported this school securely on its journey of improvement.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils take part in
visits to places of interest that then contribute
very well to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents and carers have a very high level of confidence in the work of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils are pleasant,
polite and respectful. Attendance is above
average.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers’ skilful questioning is used well, especially in guided reading and in mathematics to deepen pupils’ learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Governors make a strong contribution to the development of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘The curriculum offers many exciting opportunities for learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The extra funding for those pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is used highly
effectively.’

OFSTED comments

‘Currently, pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, develop good skills and knowledge in reading,
mathematics and a wide range of subjects. ’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers ask supplementary questions to make sure that pupils have a full understanding of the work they are doing and are making good progress. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils engage effectively in learning and enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘An analysis of pupils’ work by inspectors showed good gains in knowledge, skills and
understanding in reading, mathematics and a wide range of subjects.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents value the school’s work highly. They believe the school is well led and indicate that the new headteacher has improved the school and that staff are supporting their children well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils study a wide range of subjects and have a good range of additional activities to
broaden their experiences.’

OFSTED comments

‘The special educational needs coordinator identifies the needs of pupils very accurately and makes sure strong provision is in place to meet pupils’ needs.’

OFSTED comments