Science – subject information

Intent

Our science curriculum aims to enthuse and intrigue the next generation of scientists and engineers. Children’s natural curiosity is fostered and enriched; we recognise the place science has in everyday life and its importance in terms of our world both now and in the future. Science gives children the opportunity to gain an increasing knowledge and understanding of their world as well as developing those skills essential to scientific enquiry. Children are encouraged to gain a healthy respect for living organisms, and the physical and Earth sciences around them.

Science at Brough School gives children the opportunity to follow carefully planned lines of inquiry and build on carefully sequenced lessons of learning throughout their time in school. Knowledge acquisition and the learning of scientific skills is progressive, ensuring a strong understanding based on prior learning. New learning in all areas, such as Animals Including Humans, builds from this strong foundation of prior knowledge.

Our science curriculum aims to bring in essential skills from other subjects such as art, where children are taught to make increasingly accurate observations using drawing and sketching skills. Science also allows for the application of mathematics skills across the curriculum as well as the development of different genres of writing, thus equipping children to be effective scientists with the necessary skills of observation, data analysis and the ability to plan, write and evaluate the investigation process.

Aims

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  1. develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  2. develop an understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  3. children are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and in the future.

Implementation

In order to ensure high standards of learning and teaching in science we implement a curriculum which is engaging and thought-provoking, giving children the time to satisfy their curiosity and develop the skills they need to become scientists in the 21st century. Our provision is carefully planned and progressively developed with links across the wider curriculum.

The long-term plan maps out how science is taught across the school, identifying what scientific knowledge and skills are taught at each stage across the school. The plan is written by the subject leader in consultation with the phase leaders and other members of the teaching staff. Science is taught as discrete lessons where needed, in order to ensure the required knowledge is gained but also as part of a series of work linked to topics being studied so that children understand the interconnection of all living things and all sciences. The subject leader provides a medium-term plan for all learning, ensuring the necessary skills and knowledge are covered, before teacher’s complete their own short-term planning.

All aspects of our science curriculum are used to prepare children for life in an increasingly scientific and technological world, so that all children are as well prepared as possible. Science is taught with the expectation that all children are capable of achieving high standards in science and that all children are naturally curious scientists, in training.

Impact

At Brough Primary School we want every child to leave us in Year 6 having developed a deep appreciation for their world and a lifelong love of the sciences, regardless of whether they follow science as a career in later life or not. We want them to have experienced the awe and wonder associated with living things in their environment and we want them to have understood the physics, chemistry and biology that has been taught. This is measured through the inspired way in which children talk about the sciences and in the deep respect they show for their immediate environment and the wider world.

We want our children to really appreciate scientists and the impact (both positive and negative) their knowledge and inventions have had on our world.

Children will meet or exceed the expected standards in working scientifically and the areas of study covered between EYFS and Year 6. Children will retain the knowledge they have been taught, being able to use their knowledge to give reasonable explanations about, for example, how forces are involved in keeping a ship afloat. By Year 6, children will be able to plan an investigation independently using the language of investigation such as: independent, dependent and control variables, and recognising the relationships between them.

We measure the impact of our curriculum by: –

  • Discussing scientific knowledge with the children, gauging their understanding and retention.

  • Discussing the investigation process with children, ensuring the appropriate development of investigation language and processes.
  • Assessing how much children have learnt through each topic covered, by giving them a more formal assessment task.

Pupil comments

  • Dry Ice Volcanoes – We definitely enjoyed making the volcano explode. The best bit was adding the dry ice and watching it change to a gas. (Year 5)

  • Irreversible Change – It was interesting watching the materials burn and knowing that burning is irreversible. (Year 5)
  • Pushes and pulls – It was quite interesting to work with what we had. It was fun to work together using pushes and pulls to make different shapes. (Year 4)

  • Food Diary – It helped us recognise what we ate and how we could have really healthy meals. (Year 4)

  • Materials and Properties – I liked making a bridge in materials because you have fun, worked as a team, and you got to do crafting, and I love crafting. (Year 2)

Further information

‘The curriculum offers many exciting opportunities for learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Staff morale is high and there is a shared sense of purpose and a desire for all pupils to
achieve their full potential.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents and carers have a very high level of confidence in the work of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘All pupils spoken to say they are safe in school and they enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils make a good contribution to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘There is full engagement by the school in a local sports partnership. Pupils say that they
enjoy sport.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school promotes spiritual, moral, social and cultural education very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils study a wide range of subjects and have a good range of additional activities to
broaden their experiences.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers’ skilful questioning is used well, especially in guided reading and in mathematics to deepen pupils’ learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The enhanced provision, The Bridge, is making a significantly positive contribution to pupils’ ability to self-manage their needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Astute use of professional development and support for staff has resulted in good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘The extra funding for those pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is used highly
effectively.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils engage effectively in learning and enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils take part in
visits to places of interest that then contribute
very well to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘School leaders
and governors are passionate about pupils’ achievement and personal development. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘Parents value the school’s work highly. They believe the school is well led and indicate that the new headteacher has improved the school and that staff are supporting their children well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils are pleasant,
polite and respectful. Attendance is above
average.’

OFSTED comments

‘An analysis of pupils’ work by inspectors showed good gains in knowledge, skills and
understanding in reading, mathematics and a wide range of subjects.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers assess pupils’ work accurately and use their good subject knowledge to plan
interesting tasks that engage pupils well.’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher has made sure that senior leaders, and middle leaders, have had very
effective training’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers ask supplementary questions to make sure that pupils have a full understanding of the work they are doing and are making good progress. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher and governors have high expectations of staff and pupils.’

OFSTED comments

‘Currently, pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, develop good skills and knowledge in reading,
mathematics and a wide range of subjects. ’

OFSTED comments

‘The special educational needs coordinator identifies the needs of pupils very accurately and makes sure strong provision is in place to meet pupils’ needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Governors make a strong contribution to the development of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘The local authority has a clear picture of the development of the school and has supported this school securely on its journey of improvement.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils participate in competitive sports, such as cross-country, squash and football, as well as winning local dance competitions.’

OFSTED comments

‘The primary school physical education and sports funding is used very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Children settle quickly into Reception and make good progress because of good leadership and
good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school’s enhanced provision for those pupils who have special educational needs (SEN) and/or disabilities is a strength of the school,’

OFSTED comments