RE – subject information

Intent

Our Religious Education curriculum ensures that the children have opportunities to learn from and about religion, which will help them to understand and respect the world around them. At Brough School, we will fulfil the requirements of the The Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education by asking provoking questions about meaning and purpose in life, beliefs about God, ultimate reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human. The children will have time to explore and consider different answers to these questions. Teaching will equip pupils with systematic knowledge and understanding of a range of religions and views, enabling them to develop their ideas, values and identities. Pupils will learn the skills needed to articulate clearly and coherently their personal beliefs, ideas, values and experiences while respecting the right of others to differ.

Our Religious Education curriculum will provide the pupils with the knowledge and skills necessary to enable them to: appreciate the way that religious beliefs shape life and behaviour, develop the ability to make reasoned and informed judgements about religious and moral issues and enhance their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Children will have the opportunity to acquire and develop their knowledge and understanding of Christianity and some other principal religions represented in Great Britain.

At Brough Primary School we want children to ask questions about the world and reflect on their own beliefs, values and experiences. The Religious Education curriculum aims to encourage discussion, enquiry, debate and independence, and to agree or disagree respectfully.

Aims

The curriculum for Religious Education aims to ensure that all pupils:

Know about and understand a range of religions and worldviews, so that they can:

  • describe, explain and analyse beliefs and practices, recognising the diversity which exists within and between communities and amongst individuals
  • identify, investigate and respond to questions posed, and responses offered by some of the sources of wisdom found in religions and worldviews
  • appreciate and appraise the nature, significance and impact of different ways of life and ways of expressing meaning.

Express ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and worldviews, so that they can:

  • explain reasonably their ideas about how beliefs, practices and forms of expression influence individuals and communities
  • express with increasing discernment their personal reflections and critical responses to questions and teachings about identity, diversity, meaning and value, including ethical issues
  • appreciate and appraise varied dimensions of religion or a worldview.

Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and worldviews, so that they can:

  • find out about and investigate key concepts and questions of belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, responding creatively
  • enquire into what enables different individuals and communities to live together respectfully for the wellbeing of all
  • articulate beliefs, values and commitments clearly in order to explain why they may be important in their own and other people’s lives.

Implementation

At Brough Primary School we use The Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education developed by the East Riding of Yorkshire, Hull City, North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire councils, as the basis for our Religious Education curriculum.

In the Early Years Foundation Stage, the children will be introduced to the key festivals and special books, special people, places of worship, symbols and artefacts for Christianity and other religions studied, plus any others relevant to children in the setting.

In Key Stage 1, Children will be introduced to the concept of belief in a particular deity, the fact that the name for ‘god’ varies from religion to religion and, as relevant to the religions introduced, that some religions have particular rules about naming god.

We follow the programme of units for R.E. at Key Stages 1 and 2, which offer a ready-made scheme of work with built-in-progressions and coverage of all statutory aspects of the agreed syllabus.

From the syllabus it is required that:

  • In the Early Years Foundation Stage the learning outcomes are referenced to Christianity and are appropriate to a range of other beliefs and cultures.
  • Key Stage 1 – Christianity is studied and one other principal religion in some depth.
  • Key Stage 2 – Christianity is studied and one other different principal religion each year, in some depth.

The following religions have been selected for study:

  • Christianity
  • Judaism Years 1 and 2
  • Hinduism Years 3 and 4 on rotation with Sikhism (Rotation 2022/2023)
  • Sikhism Years 3 and 4 on rotation with Hinduism (Rotation 2021/2022)
  • Islaam Year 5
  • Buddhism Year 6

There are no presumptions made as to the religious backgrounds, beliefs and values of the children or adults. Any religious backgrounds are valued to encourage individuals to share their own experiences freely. All religions and their communities are treated with respect and sensitivity and links which can be made between, home, school and a faith community are valued. We acknowledge that each religion studied can contribute to the education of all our pupils and promote teaching in Religious Education that stresses open enquiry and first-hand experiences wherever possible; for example, REAction (An outreach event run by Label of Love and Sue Holmes an independent RE consultant) and Christingle Services.

The long-term plan maps out the topics the children will study in each Key Stage. It is taken from The Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education. The subject leader provides medium-term plans for each unit of work from the agreed syllabus outlining the knowledge, skills and key vocabulary that should be taught. This supports teachers with the development of lesson planning.

Impact

At Brough Primary School we want every child to leave us in Year 6 having had a wide range of opportunities to explore their own beliefs and the beliefs of others. The impact of these, and of the quality of the provision they received, is measured through discussions, work they produce and the knowledge and skills they have developed.

We want children to enjoy learning about religions and other cultures and have the skills required to articulate clearly and coherently their personal beliefs, ideas, values and experiences while respecting the right of others to differ. Children should have knowledge of and understand a range of religions and worldviews; be able to express ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and worldviews; and gain skills needed to engage with religions and worldviews, which will help them to meet or exceed the progression of skills requirements.

We measure the impact of our curriculum by:

  • Discussing E. work with the children to discover how they have been inspired.
  • Scrutinising children’s work, with an opportunity for dialogue between teachers and the subject leader.
  • Monitoring of taught skills across the school to evidence progress.
  • Assessing pupils’ knowledge and ability to apply this to later learning.
  • Images and recording of children’s practical learning.
  • Development of learning evidenced in topic books.

Further information:

‘Astute use of professional development and support for staff has resulted in good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils participate in competitive sports, such as cross-country, squash and football, as well as winning local dance competitions.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents value the school’s work highly. They believe the school is well led and indicate that the new headteacher has improved the school and that staff are supporting their children well.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils study a wide range of subjects and have a good range of additional activities to
broaden their experiences.’

OFSTED comments

‘School leaders
and governors are passionate about pupils’ achievement and personal development. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘The enhanced provision, The Bridge, is making a significantly positive contribution to pupils’ ability to self-manage their needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils take part in
visits to places of interest that then contribute
very well to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school’s enhanced provision for those pupils who have special educational needs
(SEN) and/or disabilities is a strength of the
school,’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils are pleasant,
polite and respectful. Attendance is above
average.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers ask supplementary questions to make sure that pupils have a full understanding of the work they are doing and are making good progress. ‘

OFSTED comments

‘Staff morale is high and there is a shared sense of purpose and a desire for all pupils to
achieve their full potential.’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher and governors have high expectations of staff and pupils.’

OFSTED comments

‘The extra funding for those pupils who have SEN and/or disabilities is used highly
effectively.’

OFSTED comments

‘The primary school physical education and sports funding is used very well.’

OFSTED comments

‘The special educational needs coordinator identifies the needs of pupils very accurately and makes sure strong provision is in place to meet pupils’ needs.’

OFSTED comments

‘Governors make a strong contribution to the development of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Currently, pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, develop good skills and knowledge in reading,
mathematics and a wide range of subjects. ’

OFSTED comments

‘An analysis of pupils’ work by inspectors showed good gains in knowledge, skills and
understanding in reading, mathematics and a wide range of subjects.’

OFSTED comments

‘There is full engagement by the school in a local sports partnership. Pupils say that they
enjoy sport.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils engage effectively in learning and enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘All pupils spoken to say they are safe in school and they enjoy school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers’ skilful questioning is used well, especially in guided reading and in mathematics to deepen pupils’ learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The headteacher has made sure that senior leaders, and middle leaders, have had very
effective training’

OFSTED comments

‘The local authority has a clear picture of the development of the school and has supported this school securely on its journey of improvement.’

OFSTED comments

‘Children settle quickly into Reception and make good progress because of good leadership and
good teaching.’

OFSTED comments

‘Pupils make a good contribution to their learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘Parents and carers have a very high level of confidence in the work of the school.’

OFSTED comments

‘Teachers assess pupils’ work accurately and use their good subject knowledge to plan
interesting tasks that engage pupils well.’

OFSTED comments

‘The curriculum offers many exciting opportunities for learning.’

OFSTED comments

‘The school promotes spiritual, moral, social and cultural education very well.’

OFSTED comments